Saltair Resort
#31
(01-13-2017, 09:58 AM)gregwibert Wrote: Based on your recreation (I understand still in progress)... I'd bet it was a fun ride back in the day!

Do we know if it burnt or if the salt finally killed it? I don't know much about the history (I didn't grow up in Utah).

I'm a little rusty on my exact Saltair history, but it sort of reads like Monty Python.  (burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp, etc.)

That place has seriously not been lucky.  But, that's what you get when you build a resort inches away from a salty lake whose primary hobby is rapid, wild swings in it's shoreline and so far away from population that it's a great target for vandalism.
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#32
Ahh yes, here it is...

- First one got sold from the Church in 1906, then burned down in 1925
- Second one opened at a time when not many people visited; fire caused $100,000 in damages in 1931; lake receded in 1933 killing off the reason people came. It closed during WWII, reopened, and then closed again in 1958 when nobody came anymore. Finally burned down for good in 1970.
- Third one opened in 1981, but was promptly flooded by the rising lake. When the lake finally dropped again, it receded back to the point where it was high & dry again, and again no one came. By the end of the '90s, it was pretty much disused, apart from the occasional concert that still gets put on out there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltair_(Utah)
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#33
There were tons of resorts along the shore. The only one that survived is the one that moved inland.
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#34
Salt rusts iron so I had a nice laugh when DragonTamer said "I'm a little rusty on my exact Saltair history". LOL!! 

Too bad the lake's water level is more consistent. I wouldn't be surprised if it changes so much because of how shallow it is.
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#35
(01-13-2017, 05:50 PM)gregwibert Wrote: Salt rusts iron so I had a nice laugh when DragonTamer said "I'm a little rusty on my exact Saltair history". LOL!! 

Too bad the lake's water level is more consistent. I wouldn't be surprised if it changes so much because of how shallow it is.

Shallow, and very flat-bottomed.  A foot in elevation change might mean a 500 foot change in the shore's horizontal position.  The lake's only about 40 feet deep in the deepest places, and only about 16 feet deep on average.  As low as it is now (seriously, I think you could walk from Farmington to Antelope Island across Farmington Bay right now without getting very wet), there was a time back in the early eighties where you literally couldn't get to Antelope Island because the causeway was under a couple of feet of water.  It got so bad, the governor at the time actually ordered pumps to be built on the west shore of the lake to drain the water out onto the salt flats & keep it from flooding roads & railways (not to mention homes).  Those pumps now sit 10 miles away from the shoreline!  (And still have to be maintained, just in case.)

(The pumping station on Google Maps, in case you're curious where they're at: https://goo.gl/maps/8JejHjXVvgp)
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#36
We should have a LagoonIsFun event to walk across from Farmington to Antelope Island! It's kind of boring until the park opens so maybe this would help us pass the time. Anyone interesting?
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#37
(01-13-2017, 06:46 PM)DragonTamer Wrote: Shallow, and very flat-bottomed.  A foot in elevation change might mean a 500 foot change in the shore's horizontal position.  The lake's only about 40 feet deep in the deepest places, and only about 16 feet deep on average.  As low as it is now (seriously, I think you could walk from Farmington to Antelope Island across Farmington Bay right now without getting very wet), there was a time back in the early eighties where you literally couldn't get to Antelope Island because the causeway was under a couple of feet of water.  It got so bad, the governor at the time actually ordered pumps to be built on the west shore of the lake to drain the water out onto the salt flats & keep it from flooding roads & railways (not to mention homes).  Those pumps now sit 10 miles away from the shoreline!  (And still have to be maintained, just in case.)

(The pumping station on Google Maps, in case you're curious where they're at:  https://goo.gl/maps/8JejHjXVvgp)

There was a point in the early 80's where the lake extended right into downtown SLC and the city looked kind of like a small version of Venice. I'll never forget that.

EDIT: Found this video about it with sweet synthesizers to boot!
Rename Roller Coaster to 'Lagoon's Classic Roller Coaster'
  • A distinct name
  • Adjective + Roller Coaster format everybody uses (white roller coaster, wooden roller coaster, etc.)
  • Describes the ride
  • Includes the current name
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#38
(01-14-2017, 05:44 PM)jetstar2 Wrote: There was a point in the early 80's where the lake extended right into downtown SLC and the city looked kind of like a small version of Venice. I'll never forget that.

EDIT: Found this video about it with sweet synthesizers to boot!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCU_AymQ6J0

Holy eighties, Batman!  Looks like they edited that beast on a Commodore 64!  Wink

For clarification:  that wasn't the lake flooding into SLC (too far for that), it was the excessive drainage from the mountains causing the rivers & creeks that run through downtown SLC to overrun their banks & flood city streets.  Sure, eventually it caused flooding in the Great Salt Lake, but the flooding downtown was strictly from runoff, not the lake itself.

I remember that year.  We had tickets on the Rio Grande Zephyr to Denver the night the Thistle slide hit... our train was delayed and had to be rerouted through Wyoming on Amtrak right-of-way instead.
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#39
(01-14-2017, 06:33 PM)DragonTamer Wrote: For clarification:  that wasn't the lake flooding into SLC (too far for that), it was the excessive drainage from the mountains causing the rivers & creeks that run through downtown SLC to overrun their banks & flood city streets.  Sure, eventually it caused flooding in the Great Salt Lake, but the flooding downtown was strictly from runoff, not the lake itself.

Yeah, I can see that after watching the video. I remember people telling me it was the lake, but I was only 5 so I wouldn't have known the difference anyway.

I distinctly remember walking across the wooden bridges over the state street river. It's awesome to see them in the video, they're exactly as I remember them except smaller. Everything is bigger when you're 5.
Rename Roller Coaster to 'Lagoon's Classic Roller Coaster'
  • A distinct name
  • Adjective + Roller Coaster format everybody uses (white roller coaster, wooden roller coaster, etc.)
  • Describes the ride
  • Includes the current name
Reply
#40
(01-13-2017, 09:58 AM)gregwibert Wrote: Based on your recreation (I understand still in progress)... I'd bet it was a fun ride back in the day!

Do we know if it burnt or if the salt finally killed it? I don't know much about the history (I didn't grow up in Utah).

It does look to be a fun ride. It from what I have been able to figure out from pictures had 3 separate double down elements and this is very speculative but my program shows some good air time on all three of those. I'll make a video of it when its finished.
[Image: 63b8acec93efb554cba7644d62fa3a0c.png]

 Expert on SALTAIR -- The Coney Island of the West
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